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Thread: Walking stick belonging to Colonel Bayly, dated 1889

  1. #11
    Administrator Chalky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmarsden View Post
    Chalky.
    I know the surname is spelt different however the fact it is made from lignum vitae and is also in the shape of a West African throwing stick leads me to believe in the Ashanti connection. It certainly an unusuall style for a Highland Officer.
    Ron.
    Hi Ron,

    I got a phone call this morning from the curator of the BW Museum. I explained about the stick and she seemed to think that there would have been a BW badge or something else (42nd) to distinguish the stick. I have looked at the style of the BW sticks from that era and can't find any of this style.

    Your call on the West India Regiment seems more accurate.

  2. #12
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    Design of the stick.

    The shape is not particularly important as this was the style at the time, according to Google.

    E081B221-1E3A-42AC-B143-6BED3003B351.jpeg

    The spelling of the name Bayly is totally significant as no Colonel would want a mis-spelling on his stick. There is zero chance that it belonged to a Col. Bailey, and it is definitely Bayly.

    Chris

  3. #13
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    The fact that it is made from lignin vitae is of no importance. The wood was very widely exported throughout the Empire and around the world. It was used to make British Police truncheons and belaying pins on Royal Navy ships. The wood has absolutely nothing to connect this walking stick to the West Indies.

    The lack of a BW motif may easily be explained, for example if it was presented on his retirement, or maybe he just didn’t want the badge on his stick!

    Chris

  4. #14
    Senior Member ronmarsden's Avatar
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    Col Bayley, 2nd West India Rgt spent most of his career in West Africa.
    Sierra Leone 1889-92.
    Gambia Expedition 1892.
    Jamaica 1894.
    Ashanti Expedition 1896.
    Benin 1897.
    Lagos hinterland 1898.
    Picture of African throwing stick, courtesy of Rose Antiquities.
    throw.jpg

  5. #15
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    With respect, Ron, I don’t see how this is remotely relevant.

    1. Walking canes with round heads were completely the fashion in 1889 and if you Google ‘walking cane 1889’ you will see hundreds of canes with this shape. I don’t know how you think that my cane has any connection to the West Indies or with West Africa.

    2. The name on my stick is Bayly, not Bayley. This absolutely kills your theory.

    3. The wood of my stick was widely exported and was used for walking canes around the world, as well as for countless other purposes in Britain, such as for police truncheons and naval equipment. The wood does not imply that the stick or its owner had any connection with the West Indies.

    There is, to be honest, no point in pushing the idea that the stick belonged to some Colonel Bayley, when it quite obviously was made for Colonel Bayly of the BW.

    Respectfully,

    Chris

  6. #16
    Senior Member ronmarsden's Avatar
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    Chris,
    I completly understand your point of view but apart from the name I dont see any connection with the Black Watch.
    Bayly of the BW retired in Sept 1888.

    In 1889 after the merger of the 1st & 2nd West India Rgts Col Bayley stepped down from active service.

    Without any provenance it is impossible to determine who it belonged to.
    The views I express here are only my own opinion, you could try posting on the Victorian Wars Forum to get a wider range of views.
    Regards Ron.

  7. #17
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    Excellent advice, Ron. Thank you. I will try the Victorian Wars forum. I’m very grateful for your advice.

    I didn’t realise that Col. Bayly retired in 1888. On balance, I think the stick was made for Bayly after he retired, and was living as a civilian, using the title Colonel.

    Very grateful for your thoughts.

    Chris

  8. #18
    Senior Member ronmarsden's Avatar
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    Chris,
    It will be interesting to see what suggestions come up.
    There is also Colonel Zachary Stanly Bayly CMG 1841-1916.
    He was Commandant-General Cape Colonial Forces from 1882-1892.
    This officer has the correct spelling and spent all his service in Africa.
    Ron.

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